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Holland America Lines – Grand African Voyage – 2020

  • Penguins at Boulders Beach, South Africa

    Penguins at Boulders Beach, South Africa
  • Malawi, Africa Camp - Game Drive Elephant

    Malawi, Africa Camp - Game Drive Elephant
MS Amsterdam - A060B - 74 nights
Prices available on Request

Sails from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US

Does Holland America Line float your boat?

Introducing Holland America Cruise Lines; “for explorers, foodies and music lovers.” Travel transformed; their own Explorations Central destination immersion program offers local cultural insights, insider travel tips and unique shore excursions. Live Music for everyone; enjoy the best in live music at sea, including Lincoln Center Stage, B.B. King’s Blues Club, Billboard Onboard and Rolling Stone Rock Room. The Delicious Difference; on board, savour unrivalled experiences in food, wine and spirits, guided by our Culinary Council of seven world-renowned Michelin star celebrity chefs. Ranked #1 in onboard dining. Wonder’s Await; Holland America Line’s carefully crafted itineraries take you to the world’s great landmarks and local hideaways in more than 450 ports of call. Our Stunning Ships; our modern, designer ships are well-appointed yet comfortable, brimming with activities yet not overcrowded. That’s why we think they’re perfect for exploring.

Grand African Voyage

Enjoy a fantastic cruise – the Grand African Voyage, especially good value as a fly cruise. Firstly, saddle up in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US. Next, explore Agadir’s souks and the ancient city of Petra. Also, set out in search of lions and historic sites in Mombasa and Cape Town. Additionally, savour Dakar’s eclectic food scene. Finally, return with fond memories after an epic Grand African Voyage.

For more information on Holland America Line cruises, Click Here.


Dates

8th October 2020


Cruise Itinerary

Thursday 8th October 2020

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US

Shimmering blue waters, swaying palm trees and soft ocean breezes greet you in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, where you’ll find yourself somewhere between laid-back island time and the fast pace of a thriving city. In this sun-filled, year-round beach town, pristine beaches are the main attraction, shorts and flip-flops are the daily uniform, and yachts are often the preferred form of transportation. It’s a place where you can do as much, or as little, as you desire.

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Because of its many canals and waterways, Ft. Lauderdale is sometimes called the Venice of America. It’s home to the annual Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show, one of the largest in-water boat shows in the world. Visitors can easily get a taste of the area’s nautical lifestyle by cruising the Intracoastal Waterway on an old-fashioned paddle wheeler. Other options include hopping aboard one of the popular water taxis or Venetian gondolas that glide down the historic New River, which flows right through town.

While Ft. Lauderdale is often overshadowed by its flashy neighbor, Miami, the port city is expanding rapidly as major developers and high-end resorts build up the beachfront and surrounding neighborhoods. Visitors will find world-class shopping on famous Las Olas Boulevard, celebrated restaurants and a cultural explosion in the Riverwalk Arts & Entertainment District. It’s clear that Ft. Lauderdale is solidifying its place as a sophisticated destination.

Friday 9th October 2020

At Sea

Saturday 10th October 2020

At Sea

Sunday 11th October 2020

At Sea

Monday 12th October 2020

At Sea

Tuesday 13th October 2020

At Sea

Wednesday 14th October 2020

At Sea

Thursday 15th October 2020

At Sea

Friday 16th October 2020

Funchal, Madeira, Portugal

When Portuguese navigators set foot on the island of Madeira in 1419, they were convinced that they had arrived at the Garden of Eden. Today, the experience is no different for cruise passengers docking in Funchal, Madeira’s largest city and the capital of a namesake autonomous region. Madeira’s consistently warm weather and volcanic mountains lush with tropical flowers and gardens drew European settlers whose influence gave rise to much of what it’s known for: Madeira wine, poncha (a traditional drink made of distilled sugarcane, honey and lemon) and handiwork such as embroidery.

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Wander cosmopolitan Funchal’s streets paved with black and white mosaics, a grand seafront promenade and old-fashioned shops, restaurants and cafés housed in terra-cotta-roofed buildings.

Although the majority of places of interest are close to the Atlantic Ocean’s pebbled shore, some of the city’s most worthwhile attractions are situated above sea level; take a cable car to the peaks that rise over the harbor for a bird’s-eye perspective of an island as much a paradise from above as it is from below.

 

Saturday 17th October 2020

Arrecife, Lanzarote, Canary Islands, Spain

Rugged, volcanic Lanzarote—the northeasternmost island of the Canary Islands, which are part of Spain yet lie less than 200 kilometers off the coast of Morocco—is small enough that you can travel its whole length in less than an hour. Driving between the small towns on the island, dotted with some 300 volcanic cones, visitors pass wineries around La Geria valley; its vast estates are covered by odd little lava stone pits designed to protect individual vines from the wind. (Viticulture has a long history here—El Grifo winery was founded in 1775.) All over the island, the works of celebrated local sculptor, painter and architect César Manrique can be seen in the most unexpected places.

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A former fishing village, the port of Arrecife (meaning “reef” in Spanish and named after the offshore reefs that long provided protection from pirates) is now a medium-sized city. Despite its location in the Atlantic, Arrecife has a decidedly Mediterranean feel with seafront promenades lined with palms. El Charco tidal lagoon is a popular venue for strolling and photographing traditional fishing boats at anchor. On Saturdays, a food and crafts market pops up around the lagoon and the Church of San Ginés; every day of the week, small tapas bars are always welcoming.

Sunday 18th October 2020

Agadir, Morocco

Regardless of when you visit Agadir, on Morocco’s Atlantic Coast, your chances of arriving on a sunny day are pretty high. That selling point has made it a popular seaside resort for Europeans, who stroll along the promenade and surf, wet bike and ride camels on the seemingly endless crescent-shaped beach. Here, you can sip a cup of Berber tea at a café, grab a pint at a pub or dine and dance at one of the beach clubs. Beyond the beach, much of the area’s history has been erased, and all that can be seen today are modern whitewashed buildings and palm-lined boulevards. (Though it was the site of an ancient Roman port and occupied by both the French and the Portuguese, Agadir was almost completely destroyed by an earthquake in 1960 and little of its past survived.) You can still explore the region’s heritage at the Amazigh Museum, which provides an introduction to Berber culture, and the hilltop casbah, built in the 16th century. Don’t miss the souks, with local products like saffron, olive oil, dates and Berber handicrafts, including silver jewelry, handmade slippers, carpets and pottery. Outside Agadir, red-walled towns and valleys with limestone canyons and waterfalls await.

Monday 19th October 2020

Casablanca, Morocco

Casablanca is Morocco’s largest city and its most important port. While Rabat is the country’s official capital, Casablanca is its economic and cultural hub, the place where Moroccans go to make it big. There has been a settlement here since before the Romans, and although the Barbary pirates and Portuguese also left their marks, it wasn’t until the French colonial period that Casablanca truly came into its own. The modern city was the first in the world to be laid out by aerial survey, and was barely 20 years old when its name was framed forever in the Hollywood classic of the same name.

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But Casablanca isn’t just a place for movie nostalgia—its tremendous Hassan II Mosque puts Moroccan tradition on a distinctly modern trajectory, while its trams whisk you past Art Deco architecture to Dubai-inspired malls and city beaches.

Casablanca’s central location on the Atlantic coast also means that day trips to the historic imperial cities of Marrakech and Rabat are an easy option. We suggest you gulp down a shot of Moroccan espresso at a street café and dive right in.

Tuesday 20th October 2020

At Sea

Wednesday 21st October 2020

At Sea

Thursday 22nd October 2020

La Goulette (Tunis), Tunisia

Tunis, the nearby capital, offers a bustling medina as well as the Bardo Museum, famed for its collection of mosaics and major finds from nearby Carthage, once the glorious rival of Rome.

Friday 23rd October 2020

Valleta, Malta

The ancient city of Valletta is teeming with historic monuments, churches and gardens. At just one-third of a square mile in area, Europe’s southernmost capital is one of the easiest to explore on foot. Given Malta’s strategic location and succession of rulers including the Romans, Normans, Sicilians, Spanish, Knights of St. John, French and British, it’s somewhat surprising to see Valletta so well preserved. The city dates back to the 16th century and has been listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1980. Extensive restorations of historic buildings are underway, including the rebuilding of the city entrance to mark Valletta’s recognition as the European Capital of Culture in 2018. Decades of British rule mean that English remains an official language, along with the local Maltese language, plus a curious mix of Italian vocabulary and Semitic roots. As Malta lies just 50 miles south of Sicily, Italian influences dominate the cuisine and culture. Even so, the Maltese do value their own traditions, such as the folk music known as Għana, which features strong yet poetic male vocals over slow guitar music.

Saturday 24th October 2020

At Sea

Sunday 25th October 2020

At Sea

Monday 26th October 2020

Cruising Suez Canal

Bordered by Port Said in the north at the mouth of the Mediterranean Sea and Port Suez in the south at the mouth of the Red Sea, the Suez Canal flows 193 kilometers (120 miles) through the Isthmus of Suez, across saline lakes known as the Bitter Lakes. Built under the guidance of French diplomat Ferdinand de Lesseps, the canal took 10 years to construct, opening in 1869. It’s noteworthy for its narrow width—which means that large ships need to travel single file and wait for each other to pass—and the fact that it has no locks, so water flows through from one sea to the other. When the Suez Canal opened, it eliminated the need for ships to sail around Africa to reach South Asia: It reduced the journey by 7,000 kilometers (4,350 miles).

Tuesday 27th October 2020

At Sea

Wednesday 28th October 2020

Aqaba (Petra), Jordan

Jordan may appear at first glance like a vast, empty land, but its territory has been inhabited for 6,000 years and it is home to an enormous number of historic sites and natural wonders. Most of them are easily accessible just off of the King’s Highway, which stretches from the capital, Amman, down to Aqaba on the Red Sea. As the country’s only port, Aqaba has long been linked to the legend of Lawrence of Arabia, or T.E. Lawrence, and to the famous 1962 film by Sir David Lean. The massive Aqaba flagpole is, at 131 meters (430 feet), one of the tallest in the world and commemorates the Great Arab Revolt of 1916 against the Ottoman Empire in which Lawrence played a key role. Aqaba is a decidedly quieter place now than in the heyday of revolt, whether one comes for the deepwater dive spots, duty-free shopping or its new high-end residential and resort district. Old Aqaba, with a fort that dates from the era of Christian crusaders, continues to be a wonderfully atmospheric neighborhood. There, after a long day in the desert heat, visitors can seek out a Turkish bath for a massage and scrub or take a break from exploring at any number of cafés that overlook the port.

Thursday 29th October 2020

Aqaba (Petra), Jordan

Jordan may appear at first glance like a vast, empty land, but its territory has been inhabited for 6,000 years and it is home to an enormous number of historic sites and natural wonders. Most of them are easily accessible just off of the King’s Highway, which stretches from the capital, Amman, down to Aqaba on the Red Sea. As the country’s only port, Aqaba has long been linked to the legend of Lawrence of Arabia, or T.E. Lawrence, and to the famous 1962 film by Sir David Lean. The massive Aqaba flagpole is, at 131 meters (430 feet), one of the tallest in the world and commemorates the Great Arab Revolt of 1916 against the Ottoman Empire in which Lawrence played a key role. Aqaba is a decidedly quieter place now than in the heyday of revolt, whether one comes for the deepwater dive spots, duty-free shopping or its new high-end residential and resort district. Old Aqaba, with a fort that dates from the era of Christian crusaders, continues to be a wonderfully atmospheric neighborhood. There, after a long day in the desert heat, visitors can seek out a Turkish bath for a massage and scrub or take a break from exploring at any number of cafés that overlook the port.

Friday 30th October 2020

At Sea

Saturday 31st October 2020

At Sea

Sunday 1st November 2020

At Sea

Monday 2nd November 2020

At Sea

Tuesday 3rd November 2020

Salalah, Oman

Tucked between the Dhofar Mountains and the Arabian Sea, subtropical Salalah is the gateway to Southern Oman’s pristine white-sand beaches, dramatic natural beauty and ancient frankincense-trade routes. Each year from July to September, the rains of the khareef, a monsoon that blows in from the Indian Ocean, transform the Dhofar region’s stark desert vistas into lush oases dotted with seasonal waterfalls and grazing camels. Enjoy a scenic drive through these misty-green peaks and wadis, worlds away from the bone-dry Omani heartland to the north. Spend an afternoon strolling under coconut palms and frankincense trees on one of Salālah’s hidden beaches. Follow in the footsteps of famed travelers like Ibn Battutah, Marco Polo and the Queen of Sheba at the region’s four \”Land of Frankincense\” UNESCO World Heritage Sites. These waterfront archaeological parks bear witness to a rich history of traffic in incense and spices dating back to the Neolithic period. Merchants from all over the world once swarmed Salālah’s ports and markets. Today, the city retains its identity as a crossroads for cultures, climates and landscapes. A journey through Salalah’s tropical-fruit plantations and bustling souks will transport you from the Arabian Desert to Zanzibar, India and beyond.

Wednesday 4th November 2020

At Sea

Thursday 5th November 2020

At Sea

Friday 6th November 2020

At Sea

Saturday 7th November 2020

At Sea

Sunday 8th November 2020

Victoria, Mahe, Seychelles

The Seychelles, a group of 115 islands in the Indian Ocean about 1,000 miles off the east coast of Africa, impresses visitors with its pristine natural beauty and indigenous plants and animals, such as the hawksbill turtle and the magpie robin. On the island of Mahé, Victoria—the nation’s main city and one of the smallest capitals in the world—bustles with activity and is home to nearly a third of the Seychelles’ population. Set against steep, velvet-green mountains that include 905-meter (3,000-foot) Morne Seychellois, the island’s highest peak, the city is a colorful patchwork of tin-roofed buildings. It displays a vibrant Creole heritage that’s evident in the conversations of locals (English is the official language, but Seychellois Creole is the lingua franca) and the aroma of fragrant spices wafting from its open-air market. Beyond the market area, Victoria’s main sights are the circa 1903 Victorian clock tower Little Ben, modeled after its larger counterpart in London, and the Arul Mihu Navasakthi Vinayagar temple, the only Hindu temple on the islands. Just outside of town is the tranquil Seychelles National Botanical Gardens, but to truly appreciate Mahé Island, one must head to the beach—and luckily there are more than 60 from which to choose.

Monday 9th November 2020

Victoria, Mahe, Seychelles

The Seychelles, a group of 115 islands in the Indian Ocean about 1,000 miles off the east coast of Africa, impresses visitors with its pristine natural beauty and indigenous plants and animals, such as the hawksbill turtle and the magpie robin. On the island of Mahé, Victoria—the nation’s main city and one of the smallest capitals in the world—bustles with activity and is home to nearly a third of the Seychelles’ population. Set against steep, velvet-green mountains that include 905-meter (3,000-foot) Morne Seychellois, the island’s highest peak, the city is a colorful patchwork of tin-roofed buildings. It displays a vibrant Creole heritage that’s evident in the conversations of locals (English is the official language, but Seychellois Creole is the lingua franca) and the aroma of fragrant spices wafting from its open-air market. Beyond the market area, Victoria’s main sights are the circa 1903 Victorian clock tower Little Ben, modeled after its larger counterpart in London, and the Arul Mihu Navasakthi Vinayagar temple, the only Hindu temple on the islands. Just outside of town is the tranquil Seychelles National Botanical Gardens, but to truly appreciate Mahé Island, one must head to the beach—and luckily there are more than 60 from which to choose.

Tuesday 10th November 2020

At Sea

Wednesday 11th November 2020

At Sea

Thursday 12th November 2020

Mombasa, Kenya

Vibrant Mombasa lies on the coast, home to white sand beaches and coral reefs teeming with tropical sea life. The remains of Fort Jesus stand out from the harbor and are home to a small historic museum.

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Get a taste of local Swahili village traditions in Mombasa’s Old Town, where narrow streets and curio shops beckon. Buildings here are based on ancient designs and feature intricate carvings and detailed lattice work. In the modern center, stroll Moi Avenue for a souvenir, and discover the city’s famous ceremonial arch. Nearby, the Shimba Hills National Reserve is home to the rare endangered sable antelope. Adventurers can head to Mamba Village in Nyali, East Africa’s largest crocodile farm.

Friday 13th November 2020

Mombasa, Kenya

Vibrant Mombasa lies on the coast, home to white sand beaches and coral reefs teeming with tropical sea life. The remains of Fort Jesus stand out from the harbor and are home to a small historic museum.

Read more

Get a taste of local Swahili village traditions in Mombasa’s Old Town, where narrow streets and curio shops beckon. Buildings here are based on ancient designs and feature intricate carvings and detailed lattice work. In the modern center, stroll Moi Avenue for a souvenir, and discover the city’s famous ceremonial arch. Nearby, the Shimba Hills National Reserve is home to the rare endangered sable antelope. Adventurers can head to Mamba Village in Nyali, East Africa’s largest crocodile farm.

Saturday 14th November 2020

Zanzibar, Tanzania

Off the coast of Tanzania, Zanzibar Is the Spice Island, one of the few places where saffron is produced. Explore its white-sand beaches, Jozani forest (watch for monkeys!), caves and open-air market.

Sunday 15th November 2020

At Sea

Monday 16th November 2020

Mamoudzou, Mayotte

Known locally as Momoju, Mamoudzou is the capital of the French overseas collectivity of Mayotte. Located in the Indian Ocean, between northern Madagascar and northern Mozambique, Mayotte encompasses the largest coral lagoon in the world, more than 1,000 square kilometers in size. Enjoy world-class snorkeling and diving; discover where sea turtles come to roost; and in August and September, watch for humpback whales with their calves.

Tuesday 17th November 2020

Andoany (Hell-Ville), Nosy-Be, Madagascar

Located just off the northwest coast of Madagascar, Nosy Be is a beautiful tropical island covered with palm trees and bougainvillea. Nicknamed “the scented island” for its aromatic cultivation of coffee, cocoa, ylang-ylang, vanilla, and cinnamon, Nosy Be is a heavenly place to swim, snorkel or simply relax on un-crowded beaches. You can also tour Lokobe Reserve, a nature reserve protecting Madagascar’s famous Black Lemurs and the beautiful Panther Chameleon.

Wednesday 18th November 2020

At Sea

Thursday 19th November 2020

At Sea

Friday 20th November 2020

Maputo, Mozambique

Mozambique’s capital and largest city, Maputo, has finally recovered from a 15-year civil war that ended in 1992, and is now bounding toward prosperity, thanks to one of Africa’s fastest-growing economies. For curious travelers, there’s much to discover here: You’ll find a fascinating swirl of cultures—including Portuguese, Bantu, Arab, Chinese and Indian—and be energized by the lively atmosphere of a young, vibrant Africa on the move.   Recent investments in Maputo’s parks and museums as well as in the historic Baixa quarter have put a new shine on much of the city. A good place to start your exploration of the two main neighborhoods, uptown and Baixa, is Independence Square, the gateway to both areas. Here, architectural styles mix to surprising effect. Next, head to the central market in Baixa, the historic heart of town, for a glimpse of residents’ daily life and to visit some of the cultural highlights such as the National Money Museum, housed in one of Maputo’s oldest buildings. Don’t miss the beautiful gardens at the Natural History Museum, the elegant old train station and the underappreciated modernist architecture dating from when Mozambique was ruled by Portugal. Maputo consistently delivers surprises like these—and more.

Saturday 21st November 2020

Richards Bay, South Africa

A bustling port town with year-round warm weather, Richards Bay is home to South Africa’s largest harbor. The golden sands of the coastline stretch from the Tugela River to the border of Mozambique. These serene beaches are also home to the Richards Bay Game Reserve, a protected lagoon that is home to aquatic birds, hippos, sharks and crocodiles.

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Nearby, the endless rolling hills, valleys and plains of Zululand give way to lush forests that bear witness to the land’s rich history, including the great Anglo-Zulu war. The Zulu are considered one of the great nations of Africa. Activities include wilderness adventure and exploration of the many museums and historical sites.

Sunday 22nd November 2020

At Sea

Monday 23rd November 2020

At Sea

Tuesday 24th November 2020

Cape Town, South Africa

Cape Town’s spectacular setting on Table Bay, beneath the 1,082-meter (3,550-foot) Table Mountain and Lion’s Head, seldom fails to take one’s breath away, whether you are a local or a visitor. If Johannesburg is South Africa’s New York, this port city of four million, settled by traders from the Dutch East India Company in 1652, is its San Francisco. With a rich array of restaurants, galleries, vineyards and countless beaches, as well as a Mediterranean climate, life on the Cape Peninsula, which stretches for some 70 kilometers (43 miles) from downtown to the most southerly point, Cape Point, is genteel and all about good, healthy living and staying outdoors as much as possible. The Table Bay side of the city, known for its luxurious seaview properties and bustling nightlife, is countered by equally intriguing False Bay, which lies behind Table Mountain and is home to quaint, cobblestoned fishing villages like Kalk Bay, as well as the city’s famous penguin colony. There, too, you’ll find the oldest (and some of the best) vineyards in Africa, such as Constantia Uitsig and Buitenverwachting. If you visit, though, be warned: Once might not be enough.

Wednesday 25th November 2020

Cape Town, South Africa

Cape Town’s spectacular setting on Table Bay, beneath the 1,082-meter (3,550-foot) Table Mountain and Lion’s Head, seldom fails to take one’s breath away, whether you are a local or a visitor. If Johannesburg is South Africa’s New York, this port city of four million, settled by traders from the Dutch East India Company in 1652, is its San Francisco. With a rich array of restaurants, galleries, vineyards and countless beaches, as well as a Mediterranean climate, life on the Cape Peninsula, which stretches for some 70 kilometers (43 miles) from downtown to the most southerly point, Cape Point, is genteel and all about good, healthy living and staying outdoors as much as possible. The Table Bay side of the city, known for its luxurious seaview properties and bustling nightlife, is countered by equally intriguing False Bay, which lies behind Table Mountain and is home to quaint, cobblestoned fishing villages like Kalk Bay, as well as the city’s famous penguin colony. There, too, you’ll find the oldest (and some of the best) vineyards in Africa, such as Constantia Uitsig and Buitenverwachting. If you visit, though, be warned: Once might not be enough.

Thursday 26th November 2020

At Sea

Friday 27th November 2020

Luderitz, Namibia

In the little coastal town of Luderitz, wiener schnitzel, beer and oompah bands lend a Germanic air to local festivals; and tribal Herero women wear missionary skirts along with their own towering cloth headdresses. Is this Africa, or is this Bavaria?

Saturday 28th November 2020

Walvis Bay, Namibia

Sitting between the Namib Desert and the Atlantic Ocean, Namibia’s Walvis Bay sparkles in colors both vivid and varied, from its golden beaches, blue waters and deep-pink flamingos on the coast to the red-and-tan dunes of the nearby desert and the brightly painted colonial buildings of Swakopmund, just over 40 kilometers, or 24 miles, to the north. Its unique biological diversity includes abundant marine life, particularly seals, sea turtles, dolphins and whales—in fact, the bay’s name comes from the Afrikaans word for whale. To take in the scope of this paradise for birders and photographers, the area around Walvis Bay is best explored on the move: on a sightseeing flight above the massive Sossusvlei clay and salt pan, in an off-road vehicle across the shifting desert landscape, or aboard a catamaran or kayak to meet the curious wildlife. As one of the few deepwater ports on the southwest African coast, the bay has been coveted by Britain, Germany and South Africa, and it has changed hands many times. Most visitors, however, come for its timeless and natural sights: the desert sands and tranquil wildlife-filled lagoons.

Sunday 29th November 2020

At Sea

Monday 30th November 2020

At Sea

Tuesday 1st December 2020

Luanda, Angola

On the west coast of southern Africa, Luanda, the capital of Angola, has seen its share of strife, but today it is a rising economic powerhouse. Founded by the Portuguese in 1576, the city struggled through decades of conflict—a war of independence followed by a civil war—before embarking on a renaissance fueled by oil and diamonds. Today, there’s a jolting divide between the haves and the have-nots, with ostentatious displays of wealth among pockets of poverty. Your first encounter with the city will likely take place on the Marginal, a commercial promenade with a jumble of modern high-rises, Soviet-style blocks and colonial houses, which runs along the bay.  Highlights of Luanda include the 16th-century Fortress of São Miguel, which houses the Museum of the Armed Forces and has panoramic views. Nearby, the pink National Bank of Angola is a beautiful example of Portuguese colonial architecture, and the Agostinho Neto Mausoleum, whose 120-meter (393-foot) height dominates the skyline, contains the remains of the first president of Angola. Have lunch at one of the chic restaurants on the Ilha de Luanda—preferably under a palm tree. This sandy spot just across the bay from Luanda attracts the city’s newly wealthy crowds and caters to their expensive tastes.

Wednesday 2nd December 2020

At Sea

Thursday 3rd December 2020

At Sea

Friday 4th December 2020

At Sea

Saturday 5th December 2020

Takoradi, Ghana

Once a modest fishing village, Takoradi is today a major port city. Explore its colonial past with a visit to the ruins of the Dutch Orange Fort. Takoradi has wonderful restaurants, be sure to sample the local cuisine at any of the beachside resorts.

Sunday 6th December 2020

Abidjan, Ivory Coast

Known as “the Manhattan of the tropics,”Abiijian is one of the Côte d’Ivoire’s two capitals. This populous city boasts one of Africa’s liveliest music scenes, picturesque lagoons lined with swaying palm trees, as well as coffee and cocoa plantations.

Monday 7th December 2020

At Sea

Tuesday 8th December 2020

At Sea

Wednesday 9th December 2020

Banjul, Gambia

The Gambia is defined by a river, the one that gives the nation its name. The long, narrow country stretches from the Atlantic into Africa for some 475 kilometers (295 miles), and consists of the Gambia River and its banks—spanning only 48 kilometers (30 miles) at its widest point. This smallest country on the African mainland is also home to the continent’s smallest capital, Banjul, with fewer than 35,000 residents. Sitting on an island where the river enters the ocean, Banjul is decidedly laid-back, without the bustling city center—or traffic jams—of Africa’s larger metropolises.The Gambia also has the distinction of having enjoyed a relatively stable government since independence. That, combined with a warm tropical climate and miles of beautiful beaches along its Atlantic coastline, has attracted a thriving expat community. For most visitors to Banjul, the nearby beaches and quiet pace of life here are its main draws. Among the popular sights are The Gambia National Museum, which recounts the history of the country as well as daily life for the nation’s residents, and the Abuko Nature Reserve, the country’s first national park, which provides an excellent introduction to Africa’s flora and fauna.

Thursday 10th December 2020

Dakar, Senegal

Alluring and frenetic, Senegal’s capital, Dakar, was long a tiny settlement on the southern part of the Cape Verde peninsula. It now encompasses former colonial towns (it was once a French commune) and a handful of other villages. The hub is the Place de l’Indépendance, a buzzing square lined with both concrete-block and colonial buildings and from which streets with restaurants, shops and theaters radiate. Roads are often congested with buses, taxis and horse-drawn carriages, and the Medina quarter, home to the Grand Mosque and markets, is an explosion of color and commotion. The food scene has a lot of flavor, too, with influences from Senegal’s many ethnic groups, European past, and a large Lebanese expat community. Alongside trendy restaurants, you’ll find beachside night markets and traditional spots serving thieboudienne (seasoned fish served with rice and vegetables). Music makes up much of the pulse of Dakar—you’ll hear the drumbeats of the local mbalax music emanating from the city’s dance clubs—but there are more serene parts of Dakar, too. The streets of Île de Gorée, once a depot for the slave trade, can be hauntingly quiet, and an hour away, the pink-tinted Lake Retba offers a respite from Dakar’s never-ending sights and sounds.

Friday 11th December 2020

At Sea

Saturday 12th December 2020

Mindelo, Cape Verde

There’s something wonderful about visiting a place many people have barely heard of and would have trouble pinpointing on a map. Okay, maybe the Weather Channel fans might recognize the Cape Verde Islands (officially, the Republic of Cabo Verde) as the place where many Atlantic hurricanes form, but this volcanic 10-island archipelago located 500 kilometers (310 miles) off the northwestern coast of Africa is more prone to drought than tropical deluges. The arid, mountainous landscape, fringed by beaches, is home to about 500,000 people. The archipelago was a Portuguese colony from 1495 until achieving independence in 1975, and Mindelo is the capital of one of the northernmost islands, São Vicente. With its rich Portuguese-Creole-African culture, this city is the nation’s musical epicenter, and morna—an appealing fusion of Portuguese and African rhythms—is the signature sound. Mindelo’s cobblestoned streets are lined with music clubs and bars, and several lively festivals take place here throughout the year. Colorful colonial-style buildings surround the deep-blue harbor, along which you’ll find a small-scale reproduction of Lisbon’s landmark Tower of Belém.

Sunday 13th December 2020

At Sea

Monday 14th December 2020

At Sea

Tuesday 15th December 2020

At Sea

Wednesday 16th December 2020

At Sea

Thursday 17th December 2020

At Sea

Friday 18th December 2020

San Juan, Puerto Rico

Take a stroll along and then past the old city walls and explore the colorful cobblestone streets of old San Juan –  a UNESCO World Heritage Site and National Historic Site within the U.S. National Park Service. Taste your way through the city’s extraordinary culinary scene, immerse yourself in its colorful history, or just pull up at a beach and grab a local rum cocktail. Welcome to San Juan.

Saturday 19th December 2020

At Sea

Sunday 20th December 2020

At Sea

Monday 21st December 2020

Fort Lauderdale, Florida, US

Shimmering blue waters, swaying palm trees and soft ocean breezes greet you in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, where you’ll find yourself somewhere between laid-back island time and the fast pace of a thriving city. In this sun-filled, year-round beach town, pristine beaches are the main attraction, shorts and flip-flops are the daily uniform, and yachts are often the preferred form of transportation. It’s a place where you can do as much, or as little, as you desire.

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Because of its many canals and waterways, Ft. Lauderdale is sometimes called the Venice of America. It’s home to the annual Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show, one of the largest in-water boat shows in the world. Visitors can easily get a taste of the area’s nautical lifestyle by cruising the Intracoastal Waterway on an old-fashioned paddle wheeler. Other options include hopping aboard one of the popular water taxis or Venetian gondolas that glide down the historic New River, which flows right through town.

While Ft. Lauderdale is often overshadowed by its flashy neighbor, Miami, the port city is expanding rapidly as major developers and high-end resorts build up the beachfront and surrounding neighborhoods. Visitors will find world-class shopping on famous Las Olas Boulevard, celebrated restaurants and a cultural explosion in the Riverwalk Arts & Entertainment District. It’s clear that Ft. Lauderdale is solidifying its place as a sophisticated destination.


Your Ship: Ms Amsterdam

The third Holland America Line vessel to bear the name Amsterdam, this elegant, mid-sized ship features a three-story atrium graced by a stunning astrolabe. While on board, enjoy America’s Test Kitchen cooking shows and hands-on workshops. Thrill to our exclusive BBC Earth Experiences presentations and activities. Rejuvenate at the Greenhouse Spa & Salon. Work out at our Fitness Center. And savor our delectable array of specialty restaurants.


Price subject to availability, ABTA protected, Terms & Conditions Apply.

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Greatdays Wholesale

Greatdays offer a trade only booking service for coach and tour operators or professional group travel organisers and we can provide single or multiple elements of a holiday.

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Greatdays Holidays

Greatdays are able to offer a complete tailor-made booking service for group travel organisers with the help of one of our friendly consultants to assist you through the booking process.

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